Posts tagged Photos

First Ideas for What to Get the New Grand-baby—Just Sayin’

 
          
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Just found out we are going to be grandparents, for the first time.  So, I got to thinking, maybe I should start planning on what to do for this new addition. I checked, and my job is to spoil the kid rotten.  Or something like that. (The Japanese lady is not part of the idea stream.)

Hey, a guy can dream, can’t he. 

8 Epic Photographs Showing the Same Tiny House

It seems fair to say that most of us have become at least a little bit numb to mother nature’s beauty–or at least images of it. A splendid sunset might be good for an Instagram post or an iPhone wallpaper, but it takes the most polished time-lapse videos, the rarest cloud formations, and other scenes of nature at its most aggressively sublime to really capture our attention. Manuel Cosentino, however, has figured out a clever little way to get us to pay attention to the simpler varieties of nature’s splendor. He put a tiny little house in front of it.

It’s an intensive study in the ever-changing drama of the natural world.

The subject of each of the photographs in Behind a Little House, currently being exhibited at the Klompching Gallery in New York City, is, ostensibly, the little house the series is named after. It’s a small, simple, nondescript structure–almost platonically so–with undecorated white walls and a pale red roof. Cosentino photographs it from a considerable distance; it occupies the same place in the bottom right corner of the frame in each photograph. What’s stunning is, simply put, everything going on around it. We see the house in all sorts of different scenes: beneath a wall of fluffy clouds; silhouetted against a setting sun; standing stoically on a deeply overcast day. In some shots, we can hardly see the house at all.

What it all amounts to is an intensive study in the ever-changing drama of the natural world. The house and the sliver of land it stands on becomes a sort of frame behind which simple day-to-day weather, so often ignored, gains a majesty of its own. The photographs required countless visits to the house over a period of two years. Cosentino’s background is in film, which isn’t entirely surprising, considering the series is, in one sense, a truly epic feat of location scouting. But where he’d once specialized in visual effects–Cosentino embarked on this project in 2008, after wrapping up a Harry Potter movie–here he wanted to let the scene speak for itself. “In my work I want to create a deep bond with the public,” he says, “and I think that no amount of digital manipulation could have replaced the hundreds of hours I dedicated to working in the field.”

For Cosentino, the series tells a story of sorts. “The first photograph starts the series with a Big-Bang-like explosion and sets everything into motion,” he says. “The last is a new beginning–it represents that piece of carte blanche that we are all given with our lives.” At galleries, the photographs are shown along with a book filled with empty pages, each bearing a photo of tiny house in its bottom right corner. Visitors are encouraged to draw their own scenes behind it.

So where is this spectacular little house? Cosentino would rather not say. “I prefer it to transcend geographical placement and become an idea,” he explains. “We all live under the same sky, after all.” All that’s left for us to do is to notice it.

Full story from WIRED HERE.

photojojo:

There’s something truly special about a huge city at night. In his Urban Zoom series, Jacob Wagner made use of the trusty long exposure technique to capture the brilliance of the city after dark.

Long Exposure + Urban Metropolis = Urban Zoom

via Fubiz

Four Seasons Resort

Scottsdale, Arizona

April 2013

Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North encompasses 210  guest rooms in 25 mostly one- or two-story adobe casitas.  The casitas are set on different levels, with side or front entrances accessed by straight or turning steps. The buildings blend into one another and offer unique geometric designs in the desert. 

Human Tower Competition 2012

photojojo:

The mind-boggling images above were captured by David Oliete at the 2012 Human Tower Competition held in Tarragona, Spain. 

The 2012 Human Tower Competition Yields Intriguing Photos

God the Artist: Fireflies

odditiesoflife:

Long Term Exposure of Mating Gold Fireflies

Japanese photographer Yuki Karo goes to various places around Maniwa and Okayama Prefectures in Japan and uses long exposure to capture some stunning shots of mating gold fireflies.

Women of Steel: LIFE With Female Factory Workers in World War II
From Life magazine; full story HERE.
The character of “Rosie the Riveter” — as feminist symbol, World War II icon and mid-century heroine — is so ingrained in the American psyche that it’s sometimes difficult to remember that there was a time when Rosie didn’t, in fact, exist. In the early 1940s, though, as American women flooded the labor force in order to replace the millions of men who had gone off to war, a wide variety of songwriters, illustrators — like the Saturday Evening Post‘s Norman Rockwell — and photographers effectively invented the archetype on which all subsequent Rosies were based.
(Pittsburgh artist J. Howard Miller’s famous 1942 “We Can Do It!” poster, created for Westinghouse House and featuring easily the most famous and recognizable “Rosie” of them all, was not widely known during the war years, and only assumed its current, iconic status decades later.)

Among the photographers who documented this massive and, in a very real sense, revolutionary influx of female workers into traditionally male factory jobs — as welders, lathe operators, machinists and, of course, riveters — was LIFE’s Margaret Bourke-White.
A pioneer herself (one of LIFE magazine’s original four staff photographers, America’s first accredited woman photographer during WWII, the first authorized to fly on a combat mission, etc.), Bourke-White spent time in 1943 in Gary, Indiana, chronicling “women … handling an amazing variety of jobs” in steel factories — “some completely unskilled, some semiskilled and some requiring great technical knowledge, precision and facility,” as LIFE told its readers in its August 9, 1943, issue. The magazine went on to note:
In 1941 only 1% of aviation employees were women, while this year they will comprise an estimated 65% of the total. Of the 16,000,000 women now employed in the U.S., over a quarter are in war industries. Although the concept of the weaker sex [sic] sweating near blast furnaces, directing giant ladles of molten iron or pouring red-hot ingots is accepted in England and Russia, it has always been foreign to American tradition. Only the rising need for labor and the diminishing supply of manpower has forced this revolutionary adjustment.

The women are recruited from Gary and nearby East Chicago. A minority has drifted in from agricultural areas. They are black and white, Polish and Croat, Mexican and Scottish… The women steel workers at Gary are not freaks or novelties. They have been accepted by management, by the union, by the rough, iron-muscled men they work with day after day. In time of peace they may return once more to home and family, but they have proved that in time of crisis no job is too tough for American women.

In celebration of Women’s History Month, LIFE.com presents a series of pictures from the Gary mills in 1943, in the very midst of the Second World War. Here are portraits of individual women, pride shining from their faces, as well as characteristically marvelous Bourke-White shots of enormous machines, grease-lathered gears, powerful tools — photographs that capture the grit, grime and rugged, unexpected beauty of a factory and its workers in full production mode.

Women of Steel: LIFE With Female Factory Workers in World War II

From Life magazine; full story HERE.

The character of “Rosie the Riveter” — as feminist symbol, World War II icon and mid-century heroine — is so ingrained in the American psyche that it’s sometimes difficult to remember that there was a time when Rosie didn’t, in fact, exist. In the early 1940s, though, as American women flooded the labor force in order to replace the millions of men who had gone off to war, a wide variety of songwriters, illustrators — like the Saturday Evening Post‘s Norman Rockwell — and photographers effectively invented the archetype on which all subsequent Rosies were based.

(Pittsburgh artist J. Howard Miller’s famous 1942 “We Can Do It!” poster, created for Westinghouse House and featuring easily the most famous and recognizable “Rosie” of them all, was not widely known during the war years, and only assumed its current, iconic status decades later.)

Among the photographers who documented this massive and, in a very real sense, revolutionary influx of female workers into traditionally male factory jobs — as welders, lathe operators, machinists and, of course, riveters — was LIFE’s Margaret Bourke-White.

A pioneer herself (one of LIFE magazine’s original four staff photographers, America’s first accredited woman photographer during WWII, the first authorized to fly on a combat mission, etc.), Bourke-White spent time in 1943 in Gary, Indiana, chronicling “women … handling an amazing variety of jobs” in steel factories — “some completely unskilled, some semiskilled and some requiring great technical knowledge, precision and facility,” as LIFE told its readers in its August 9, 1943, issue. The magazine went on to note:

In 1941 only 1% of aviation employees were women, while this year they will comprise an estimated 65% of the total. Of the 16,000,000 women now employed in the U.S., over a quarter are in war industries. Although the concept of the weaker sex [sic] sweating near blast furnaces, directing giant ladles of molten iron or pouring red-hot ingots is accepted in England and Russia, it has always been foreign to American tradition. Only the rising need for labor and the diminishing supply of manpower has forced this revolutionary adjustment.

The women are recruited from Gary and nearby East Chicago. A minority has drifted in from agricultural areas. They are black and white, Polish and Croat, Mexican and Scottish… The women steel workers at Gary are not freaks or novelties. They have been accepted by management, by the union, by the rough, iron-muscled men they work with day after day. In time of peace they may return once more to home and family, but they have proved that in time of crisis no job is too tough for American women.

In celebration of Women’s History Month, LIFE.com presents a series of pictures from the Gary mills in 1943, in the very midst of the Second World War. Here are portraits of individual women, pride shining from their faces, as well as characteristically marvelous Bourke-White shots of enormous machines, grease-lathered gears, powerful tools — photographs that capture the grit, grime and rugged, unexpected beauty of a factory and its workers in full production mode.

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