Posts tagged Food

For All Our Norn Irish Fans Who Are Stuck In The States Without Their Beloved Nutella—There Is Hope.
splendidtable:

Homemade Nutella
David Leite brings us a recipe for making Europe’s favorite after-school snack in our American homes. 

A lot of people are not straining it, so you have a little bit of crunch — like crunchy peanut butter. … There are all these variations. People are making homemade Nutella frosting, people are making Nutella Pop Tarts, Nutella cupcakes, eclaires filled with Nutella instead of pastry cream.

For All Our Norn Irish Fans Who Are Stuck In The States Without Their Beloved Nutella—There Is Hope.

splendidtable:

Homemade Nutella

David Leite brings us a recipe for making Europe’s favorite after-school snack in our American homes. 

A lot of people are not straining it, so you have a little bit of crunch — like crunchy peanut butter. … There are all these variations. People are making homemade Nutella frosting, people are making Nutella Pop Tarts, Nutella cupcakes, eclaires filled with Nutella instead of pastry cream.

Food wasted by consumers in high-income countries (222 million tons) is roughly equal to the entire food production of sub-Saharan Africa (230 million tons).

Read more HERE about famine in Africa and the early warning system the US is helping to promote HERE.

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) is a USAID-funded activity that collaborates with international, regional and national partners to provide timely and rigorous early warning and vulnerability information on emerging and evolving food security issues. FEWS NET professionals in the Africa, Central America, Haiti, Afghanistan and the United States monitor and analyze relevant data and information in terms of its impacts on livelihoods and markets to identify potential threats to food security.

Once these issues are identified, FEWS NET uses a suite of communications and decision support products to help decision makers act to mitigate food insecurity. These products include monthly food security updates for 25 countries, regular food security outlooks, and alerts, as well as briefings and support to contingency and response planning efforts. More in-depth studies in areas such as livelihoods and markets provide additional information to support analysis as well as program and policy development.

FEWS NET also focuses its efforts on strengthening early warning and food security networks. Activities in this area include developing capacity, building and strengthening networks, developing policy-useful information, and building consensus around food security problems and solutions.

I come not to praise the Burger King bacon sundae, nor to bury it. I come merely to point out that sometimes, the particular flavor of contempt with which you choose to address something is as important as the contempt itself.

Oh, the Bacon Sundae.

There’s more: How We Talk About A Bacon Sundae : Monkey See (via npr)

What America Spends On Groceries

From NPR; full story HERE.

See related posts from this series, including What America Buys and What America Does For Work.

We spend less of our money on groceries than we did 30 years ago.

The way we spend our grocery money has also changed.

We now spend a much bigger share of our grocery money on processed foods, which includes things like frozen dinners, canned soups and snacks. We spend much less on meat, largely because meat is much cheaper than it was 30 years ago.

Here’s one more chart for you if you want to compare prices then and now:

Squirrel nutcase: The moral and culinary merits of exotic flesh

               

From The Economist; HERE.

THOSE brought up on Beatrix Potter, the author of “Squirrel Nutkin” and other long-loved nursery tales, may flinch; but Andrew Thornton, manager of the Budgens supermarket in the north London suburb of Crouch End, says sales of squirrel meat have soared since he started selling it in 2010.

The bushy-tailed tree-dwellers are just one category in a burgeoning market. Osgrow, a British-based firm, exports bison, crocodile (“ideal for barbecues”) and kudu meat (“juicy and low-fat”) to customers in countries where controls on wild meat are tighter. One such market is Germany, where hygiene laws forbid the eating of “cat and doglike flesh”. The German environment ministry confirms that this includes squirrel; the country’s media mock English rat-eaters. Australia sent quantities of kangaroo meat to Russia until an import ban in 2009, ostensibly on hygiene grounds (it is now being reconsidered).

Importing meat such as grouse can get around America’s fiddly laws on game farming. Zebra and wildebeest are popular too. Squirrel meat, though, is already an established delicacy in Ozark country and Tennessee; eating species farmed for fur (such as beaver) is also allowed.

No legal obstacle exists to eating the king of beasts, but roars of opposition prevented a restaurant in Tucson, Arizona, from selling lion flesh in tacos. The practicalities are daunting, too. Dave Arnold, an American campaigner, recommends braising it at 54° centigrade for fully 24 hours. The muscle content is so tough that the meat bunches up when it hits the pan; “Hold it down,” he advises.

Born Free USA, a lion-loving charity, decries the trade as a “cruel promotional gimmick”. Viva, a British animal-welfare group, believes that the squirrel-eating vogue represents a “wildlife massacre”.

Yet massacres are not always wrong. The “Save Our Squirrels” campaign urges diners to gobble the North American grey squirrel. Introduced into Britain in 1870, it has largely driven out the indigenous red squirrel (such as the fictional Nutkin). This “eat them to beat them” approach already helps keep down the population of lion fish, a rapacious stripy sea-beast which devours protected fish stocks off America’s west coast.

Wild meat is not always tasty. Mr Arnold says black bear is “bloody and a bit metallic”. Nor is it always healthy. Doctors in Kentucky say eating squirrel brains is linked to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (better known as mad-cow disease). Squirrels are now mainly sold headless. Some think those who eat them need their heads examined, too.

A Salt Harvest

splendidtable:

On this weekend’s show, reporter Lisa Morehouse observes the salt harvest of Bob La Mar, whose seasonings have an ocean flavor (or merroir) unique to California’s Mendocino Coast.

La Mar says the currents push highly saline water from the canyon up to the surface, where he uses a pump to fill his boat’s 200-gallon tank. He makes nine trips a day and stores those 1,800 gallons in holding tanks at his house.

In a shed, La Mar boils the seawater down to a concentrated brine. Then it bakes in a special oven for more than 20 hours. Salt crystals form on the surface and fall to the bottom of the baking pan.

Listen:

8 Million Pounds of Guacamole

The Super Bowl should be a national holiday — people are sure treating the Super Sunday that way. It’s a day of food; a day to get together with friends and family; a day to check out the newest commercials; and a day to watch football.  A record number of  people — 151.6 million — are projected to watch at least a part of the game.

Football almost gets overshadowed in this spectacle. More people may be concerned about Madonna’s nerves over her halftime performance than whether Rob Gronkowski’s ankle will hold up for an entire game.

The game kicks off at 6:30 p.m. on NBC. NBC’s pre-game show starts at noon, yes, six plus hours of more hype.

It’s projected $10.1 billion, or an average of $59.33 per consumer will be spent on Super Bowl Sunday. Estimated spending in the United States on Super Bowl-related merchandise, apparel and snacks is up from $8.9 billion, or $52.63 per consumer, last year, according to the Retail Advertising and Marketing Association. The second-largest food consumption day in the U.S. is Super Bowl Sunday, trailing only Thanksgiving.

We’ll be eating 30 million pounds of snacks, according to the Calorie Control Council. That’s 11.2 million pounds of potato chips, 8.2 million pounds of tortilla chips, 4.3 million pounds of pretzels, 3.8 million pounds of popcorn and 2.5 million pounds of nuts.

What we eat during the game:

30 percent: Dips and spreads.

22 percent: Chicken wings.

17 percent: Pizza.

14 percent: Chips and salty snacks; including 4,000 tons of popcorn and 14,500 tons of chips.

9 percent: Burgers, hot dogs and brats.

Other Super Bowl food facts and numbers to feast on:

• 325.5 million: gallons of beer drunk.

• 1,200 calories: amount the average Super Bowl watcher will consume while snacking.

• The most popular take-out and delivery items on Super Bowl Sunday are pizza, chicken wings, and sandwiches.

• 28 million: pounds of potato chips eaten worldwide.

• 1 billion: number of chicken wings eaten.

• 8 million pounds of guacamole is consumed on Super Bowl Sunday.

• 69.6 million pounds of avocados, enough to cover Cowboys Stadium field in almost 27 feet of avocados. Most are used to make the 8 million pounds of guacamole consumed, according to the Hass Avocado Board.

• Super Bowl Sunday is the biggest winter grilling day of the year.

• 7 million: number of U.S. employees estimated not to show up to work on the Monday.

• Approximately 54 percent of Americans will consume coffee the morning following Super Bowl Sunday.

• According to 7-Eleven stores, there is a 20 percent increase in the sale of antacids on the day after Super Bowl.

More fun facts HERE.