Posts tagged Family

First Ideas for What to Get the New Grand-baby—Just Sayin’

 
          
http://technabob.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/hy2m_gundam_1_12th_scale_replica_4.jpg

Just found out we are going to be grandparents, for the first time.  So, I got to thinking, maybe I should start planning on what to do for this new addition. I checked, and my job is to spoil the kid rotten.  Or something like that. (The Japanese lady is not part of the idea stream.)

Hey, a guy can dream, can’t he. 

Hey Aaron, Let’s Get This

photojojo:

The one camera we *don’t* have on our shelf — this LEGO camera that has moving parts. It was made by LEGO Suzuki!

A LEGO Camera That Has Moving Parts

Happy Birthday, Aaron

In case you ever wondered, yes, you did have a pretty cool growing up. You are indeed our favorite son, from Ghostbusters and TMNT, to Indiana Jones and to your love for Rock and Roll (there’s a sort-of joke in there somewhere).  Life is to be lived to the full, and as a young boy, you took big drinks of everything it had to offer.  Enjoy your day and I know you’ll give thanks for the great foundation God has given you to build a life of love, of friendship and of service to Him.  In the meantime, and as the great theologian Elvis always said, keep on takin’ care of business….in a flash.  Mom and Dad

Levon Helm Would Be Proud. The Punch Brothers Covering A Classic From The Band.

copycats:

The Weight - Punch Brothers
originally by The Band

For my favorite road guy, Aaron Sawyer.

‘Brave,’ Pixar’s New Animated Film: Who Needs a Prince When Fun’s Afoot?

From the NYT; full story HERE.

The riotous mass of bouncy curls that crowns Merida, the free-to-be-me heroine of the new Pixar movie, “Brave,” is a marvel of computer imagineering. A rich orange-red the color of ripe persimmon, Merida’s hair doesn’t so much frame her pale, creamy face as incessantly threaten to engulf it, the thick tendrils and fuzzy whorls radiating outward like a sunburst. There’s so much beauty, so much untamed animation in this hair that it makes Merida look like a hothead, a rebel, the little princess who wouldn’t and didn’t. Then again, Rapunzel has a supernice head of hair too.

The riotous mass of bouncy curls that crowns Merida, the free-to-be-me heroine of the new Pixar movie, “Brave,” is a marvel of computer imagineering. A rich orange-red the color of ripe persimmon, Merida’s hair doesn’t so much frame her pale, creamy face as incessantly threaten to engulf it, the thick tendrils and fuzzy whorls radiating outward like a sunburst. There’s so much beauty, so much untamed animation in this hair that it makes Merida look like a hothead, a rebel, the little princess who wouldn’t and didn’t. Then again, Rapunzel has a supernice head of hair too.

It’s easy to see why Merida prefers galloping into the world to sitting pretty at home. Early on there’s a scene in which she jumps in the saddle and races into a wonderland painted green and splashed with purple. She’s a wee thing, about the size of one of Angus’s feathered legs, but her flaming hair and fiery daring — she shoots from the saddle, bull’s-eyeing targets — make her seem bigger. When she takes a breather, surveying the land (this is her land, you sense) while Angus rolls on the grass like a puppy, you see her at peace with herself. It’s a welcome, unusually introspective interlude that slips into the ecstatic when she scrambles up a rock wall and twirls on its summit, laughing, happy, free and alone.

In contrast to Snow White’s stepmother, Elinor isn’t a classic villainess — she’s motivated by clan tradition rather than that great feminine evil: vanity. Yet she effectively performs the same instigating role, pushing the story and her daughter forward. In many respects Elinor is the most complex character in “Brave,” mostly because the filmmakers come across as seriously conflicted about her, presenting her as a model of dignified queenly restraint, then as a killjoy intent on dampening her daughter and husband’s joy — she steps on Fergus’s lines and clucks at his raucous boys-will-be-boys merriment — and finally as a comically unnatural figure of ladylike propriety. (She can be oddly oblivious to her tiny troublemaking sons, a trio who bounce around like the Ritz Brothers.)

At one point Fergus, trying to comfort Elinor, suggests that they engage in role playing, with him pretending to be Merida. “I don’t want to get married,” he announces in falsetto. “I want to stay single and let my hair flow in the wind as I ride through the glen firing arrows into the sunset.” Sounds good to me! It’s the funniest bit in the movie, but also mean and disappointingly telling. Merida doesn’t dream that her prince will come; she doesn’t have to because it’s clear that, within the logic of the movie, the alternative is comically unthinkable. It’s no great surprise that she wins the struggle to determine her fate. But hers is a contingent freedom won with smiles, acquiescence and a literal needle and thread with which she neatly sews up the story, repairing a world where girls and women know exactly where they stand.

This Needs To Go Up At The Creech Lake House
from ralieghwoodrockstar

This Needs To Go Up At The Creech Lake House

from ralieghwoodrockstar

How Feminism Begat Intensive Mothering

                   

From Belinda Luscombe at Time Magazine; full story HERE.

Feminism and motherhood have long been cast as feuding sisters, one always attempting to undermine the other. In this calculation, women had to choose between the independence, education and self-expression of the feminist path and the nurture, sacrifice and child-centricity of the family path. The more feminist a woman is, the less appetite, it has been suggested, she will have for mothering.

Ironically, however, the opposite is true.

Women’s rising social and economic power has not squelched their desire to be mothers. Quite the opposite: it has enabled women to mother with ferocity. They research; they seek out best practices; they join a group, form a committee and agitate for their version of feeding/disciplining/sleeping. If you don’t believe me, just visit a breast-feeding support group with former litigators, marketing executives and investment bankers. Reluctant sucklers don’t stand a chance.

(MORE: Confessions of an Accidental Attachment Parent)

At heart, the reality of the feminist revolution was that women could do just about anything. But to get the opportunity to do it, they had to surmount men’s — and other women’s — assumptions. They had to get educated, work hard and exceed the expectations of those around them. And it worked, pretty much.

More women now graduate from college than men. Young working females in dozens of big cities across the country earn more than young working males. A Big Business CEO with ovaries, while not common, is no longer a miraculous being.

But as women have brought more education and commitment to their careers, they have also brought those qualities to their other job: having and raising children. From the labor room onward, women strive to overdeliver. Attachment parenting requires sacrifice, dedication, strategizing and a lot of long hours doing thankless tasks. In other words, it’s exactly like climbing the corporate ladder. Except there is no glass ceiling. Or annual bonus.

(MORE: Parents Do What’s Right for Them, Not for the Kids)

This is not to say that the aims of motherhood and feminism are always in harmony. The affluent, slightly older and well-educated moms who are most likely perusing parenting books like those written by William Sears have already tasted financial independence, self-sufficiency and freedom of movement. They quickly become acutely aware that parenting severely curtails those things. And they want to make their sacrifices mean something. If they’re giving up so much to raise this new human, they’re going to make sure the kid is raised like a blue chip stock price.

Having been urged all their lives to make choices, take charge of their lives and be their best selves, they have become parents reflective of that push. We’ve educated women to forge a new path. Why did we think they’d treat raising children any differently?